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Wed
22
Jun
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Girl Scout Camp 2011

Wed
22
Jun
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Weather's Good For The Mosquitoes But Bad For People

Been outside lately? Its hard to escape the dive bombing mosquitoes. Not only are mosquitoes bothersome with their biting but they can carry a variety of potential diseases. Some of these that occur most commonly in the United States include, St. Louis encephalitis (although there are several varieties of encephalitis they can carry), Eastern and Western Equine Encephalitis, canine heartworm, and of course West Nile Virus.

Fairbury has already been on top of it. The first round of spraying has already been completed last Tuesday and Wednesday. But techniques have changed and one may not have noticed the spray.

Wed
22
Jun
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Jim Cummings The Inventor Of The Bulldozer

by Mitch Zabokrtsky

By the 1850s the nation was exploring rapid changes in manufacturing, transportation and other aspects of life due to inventions and new ideas. Settlers were moving west. Railroads spread across the nation. Oil was discovered in Titusville, Pennsylvania.

In the 1920s there was a need to transport crude oil and refined petroleum products. Underground pipelines were being laid across America.

In 1923 Jim Cummings witnessed the laying of a pipeline near Morrowville, Kansas in Washington County. The work was slow and laborious. The pipeline workers using horses, mules and slip scrapers to fill the ditch after the pipeline was laid could only fill 500 to 700 feet of ditch per day.

Jim Cummings, with his interest in mechanical devices, soon developed a machine to speed up the work.

Wed
22
Jun
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Steele City Village Life-Visit 171 - 1930s

On this visit we are going to go back to the 1930s for a poem that extols some of the qualities of our village and village life. Most people take pride in their hometown and like to do a little bragging. So, here is a poem about the Steele City community.

Our Home Town

by Mrs. Hubert Manning

On the plains of Nebraska there is a quaint little town,

That is known and liked for miles around:

Where friends make friends, and hearts are lighter,

And hand shakes seem a little tighter.

On the south and west is the Little Blue River

with its babble so sweet,

And the large trees towering across it to meet

Are the homes for our lowed birds to nest,

Wed
22
Jun
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Human Trafficking- Not Just A Problem Over There

Human trafficking is a serious and very real tragedy that reaches out globally. The average age of the girls forced into this slavery is 15 years old. These precious daughters are forced to have sex with as many as 40 clients a day. They become accustom to a life of beating or torture. They cannot leave the brothel, are often denied sufficient food, and are not paid. Often these girls are forced to have unsafe abortions in the brothel, since many of the men do not use condoms. HIV and other sexually transmitted diseases are very common. After they are found to have HIV, the girls are thrown out. If they dare return to their villages, they face being ostracized because of what they have been-because of what was done to them. Families will not take them back, and their prospects for marriage, or a job are non-existent. Of those who don't die of AIDS, most end up back on the street, selling themselves.

Wed
22
Jun
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Darline Bergmeier

Darline L. Bergmeier was born on March 2, 1928 in Beatrice to Martin and Hulda (Brandt) Scherling. She died June 15, 2011 at the Beatrice Manor Care Center in Beatrice at the age of 83.

She was a 1946 graduate of DeWitt High School and attended Fairbury Junior College in Fairbury and Concordia College in Seward.

She and Gaylord Bergmeier were married on Oct. 29, 1950 in Plymouth. She had lived in the DeWitt and Plymouth areas her entire life until moving into Beatrice in 2004.

She was a member of the Trinity Lutheran Church in DeWitt, the Patience & Hope Circle, had taught Sunday School, and had also attended St. John Lutheran Church in Beatrice; member of the American Legion and Eagle Club Auxiliaries in Beatrice; had been a Hospice, Elder Care and Blood Mobile volunteer; and was a member of the DeWitt Historical Society and DeWitt Community Club.

Wed
22
Jun
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Margaret Schwartz

Margaret E. Schwartz was born April 14, 1916 near Hanover, Kan., the daughter of Fred Jr. and Maggie (Seitz) Wulff. She died June 15, 2011 at Gardenside Longterm Care in Fairbury, Neb., at the age of 95.

She was baptized and confirmed in the Zion Lutheran Church in Hanover by Pastor Karl Klinger. She attended Hanover public schools.

On Feb. 25, 1936, she married Paul Lohse at Hanover. To this union three children were born. They lived near Lanham for 11 years, then near Hollenberg, Kan. until he passed away.

On Nov. 11, 1963, she married Joe Schwartz of Hanover. He worked in construction so the next few years were spent living in various towns following his job. In January 1967 they settled down in Hanover.

She worked part time at Schwartz's Store for several years.

Wed
22
Jun
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Cecil Maschman

Cecil H. Maschman, 75, of Daykin, Neb., died June 20, 2011 at Jefferson Community Health Center in Fairbury.

Survivors include his wife, Fern; sons, Jim Maschman and special friend, Heather Knudson of Fairbury, Jerry Maschman and wife, Teresa of Daykin; nine grandchildren; two great-granddaughters; sisters, Donna Drees and husband, Raymond of Daykin, Rheta Henke and husband, Gordon of Leawood, Kan.; sisters-in-law, Lillian Maschman of Lincoln and Carolyn Maschman of Daykin; brothers-in-law, Marvin Hohbein and special friend, Esther Rabel of Lincoln and Harvey Hohbein and wife, LaFaye of Cheyenne, Okla.

Services will be held at 10:30 a.m. Thursday, June 23 at St. John Lutheran Church in Daykin with the Rev. Lawrence Fruhling officiating. Memorials to family choice in lieu of flowers. Burial will be in the St. John Lutheran Cemetery. Gerdes-Meyer Funeral Home, Fairbury, service.

Wed
22
Jun
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Time For West Nile To Come A Calling

West Nile Virus, a term that by now has become familiar. West Nile is carried by mosquitoes, but only by very specific mosquitoes. Nebraska has over 50 varieties of mosquitoes and only the culex mosquito actually carries this virus. Right about this time of year is when this specific variety of mosquito starts to appear.

West Nile virus mainly infects birds, but is known to infect humans, horses. dogs, cats just to name a few. This is transmitted when the mosquito bites an infected bird and then bites the next animal. The specific birds in this area that most commonly could have West Nile Virus is the American Crow, Black Billed Magpie, Blue Jay, Red Tailed Hawk, Peregrine Falcon and the Owl. If anyone should find a dead bird, especially of one of these varieties, it needs to be brought (in a plastic bag) to the local extension office. They will send it away for testing.

Wed
22
Jun
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24th Annual Tour de Nebraska Bicycle Tour Reroutes Due To Flooding In Brownville

The 24th annual 5-day Tour de Nebraska bicycle ride will take off Wednesday, June 22 and head to southeast Nebraska with a slightly different route due to flooding along the Missouri River.

"We were looking forward to staying overnight in Brownville this year but the campground is flooded, so the city of Auburn has graciously provided last minute arrangements for us. We are still stopping in Brownville, to visit the main street shops and winery and offer all the support we can. We are very grateful for the efforts of the Auburn Chamber to make last minute arrangements to accommodate us," said Susan Rodenburg, who organizes the tour with her husband, Rich.

A total of 275 cyclists will ride on the Tour de Nebraska, which starts and ends in Syracuse and will overnight in Auburn (Wed. 6/22), Pawnee City (Thurs. 6/23), Fairbury (Fri. 6/24) and Wilber (Sat. 6/25).

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