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Wed
06
Apr

Quick Quips

• Spring brings many wonderful things, like the blooming of the trees, the smell of freshly cut grass, the warm weather and greasy hands....yep, grease in your fingernails. 
My middle daughter, Olivia,  loves to ride her bike. Living in the western part of the state, the sandburs were so bad we would go through three or four bike tubes a year, even with the green goop you put in the tires to stop punctures. 
Earlier this week I dug out her bike and prepared it for the year with new tubes and adjusting the seat and handlebars. I forgot that to do all of that, you have to pretty much take the bike completely apart, getting my hands all full of grease. 
Wed
06
Apr

Parkinson’s Support Group

The Parkinson’s Support Group will meet on Monday, April 11,  at 10 a.m. in Jefferson Community Health Center’s Small Conference Room. For more information, contact Lana Likens at Jefferson Community Health Center at (402)-729-3351.

Date: 
Monday, April 11, 2016 - 10:00am
Wed
06
Apr

The Fairbury American Legion

The Fairbury American Legion will meet on Tuesday, April 12 at 6:30 p.m. at the VFW. All veterans are invited to attend along with wives and friends. You don’t have to be a member to attend.

Date: 
Tuesday, April 12, 2016 - 6:30pm
Wed
06
Apr

Severe Weather Seminar

The 24th annual southeast Nebraska Severe Weather Seminar will be held April 10 at 12:30 p.m. at Saline Center, along Highway 15 in Saline County.
This year the keynote speech will be from the Lower Big Blue NRD and the DeWitt Area recovery Team (DART) in regard to the 2015 severe flooding in Saline County, most notably the DeWitt area.
There will also be presentations by UNL climatologist Dr. Ken Dewey, Michael Moritz, a warning coordination meteorologist and Jeremy Wesley, senior forecaster at the National Weather Service Hastings office.
Date: 
Sunday, April 10, 2016 - 12:30pm
Wed
06
Apr

The T.C. Athletic Booster Club

“Super Hero Stride” on Saturday, April 16th at 9 a.m. at Tri County Schools. This will be a 1 mile and 5K run/walk. Come dressed as your favorite Super Hero and use your smarts and strength to complete this mission. Registration starts at 8 a.m. and runners or walkers will follow the Cross Country Course. For registration information, please contact Ann at 402-239-3080 or email: aafreese@windstream.net. There is a fee.

Date: 
Saturday, April 16, 2016 - 9:00am
Wed
06
Apr

American Red Cross Blood Drive

Hosted by Fairbury Community at Elk’s Club on Tuesday, April 12 from 11:30 a.m. – 5:30 p.m.
To schedule your appointment: Call 1-800-RED-CROSS (800-733-2767)
Search sponsor code FairburyCommunityNebraska or call Verna at 402-729-2550.
Date: 
Tuesday, April 12, 2016 - 11:30am
Wed
06
Apr

A Tale Of Two Steele Cities

Decision Time--Steele City Village Board Members (l-r) Dale Ebeling, Sue Erickson, William Scheele, Ralph Broadston and Mayor Tammy Katz tabled a vote that would decide whether the village will provide bottled water to citizens, specifically those who have medical conditions. (Photo by Shaun Friedrichsen/www.fairburyjournalnews.com)

It truly was the best and worst of times at the Steele City Village board meeting as citizens try to organize a community effort to improve the village, while the board members are faced with further challenges about the water issue.
At the meeting, Kathy Carter, who at the meeting in March requested that bottled water be provided to her household because of the high nitrate levels, asked if the board would begin providing it, since they have not yet provided it. At the last meeting, according to the minutes, it was stated that, “The village will provide the water.”
“At the last meeting, I requested water, and the discussion was that anybody who requested water could receive water,” said Carter. “Then, a day or two after the meeting, I got a phone call that said I was denied the water. I did call the director of water quality at the state, and spoke with Howard Isaac.
Wed
06
Apr

Positive Action Aims To Change Young Lives

 A new opportunity for adults who want to mentor young people is available with the Positive Action program that began in January.
 This program, according to AmeriCorps member and co-organizer for Positive Action Sara Naukam, was brought about with the goal of preparing young people for the future by having fellow community members to serve as role models.
“It’s a systematic, educational, mentoring program that is evidence based,” said Naukam. “It promotes an interest in learning and promotes that if you use positive action, there will be a positive reaction. It’s a great program that’s been in place since January.”
Naukam explained that the youth and the community members meet every Tuesday evening at the Fairbury Youth Involvement Center (FYI Center) for mentoring sessions. Currently, the mentors and mentees gather in different parts of the building based on age groups.
Wed
06
Apr

City Goes After Quarter of a Million Grant

MAKING ROOM--The Fairbury City Council is continuing to move forward on cleaning up crumbling housing in city limits. (Photo by Tim Linscott/www.fairburyjournalnews.com)

“We want to help people fix up those houses who have need but maybe not the means as well as continue out path to etaring down those that are no longer livable.”
Those were the comments of city administrator Collin Bielser following Monday’s Fairbury City Council meeting in which city leaders voted unanimously to apply for a $252,000 housing rehabilitation and demolition grant. The funds would be approved as part of the Community Development Block Grant program.
According to Bielser housing has been identified as one of the chief problematic areas in Fairbury. He said the city has conducted meetings internally, with private citizens and community business leaders.
“Everyone has put there is a lack of good, livable, affordable housing at the top of their lists,” he said. “If we can get this grant it will allow us to continue working toward addressing these goals.”
Wed
06
Apr

Commissioners Accept Bids, Prepare For Busy Month

Juggling multiple issues that will arise during the month of April, the Jefferson County Commissioners started the month by accepting the bids for gravel and culverts.
There was only one bid to supply the county’s gravel, which came from Consolidated Sand and Gravel. The prices were raised approximately forty cents per ton from the previous year. 
Aggregate Manager of Consolidated Sand and Gravel Jerry Meyer explained that there is a high demand for gravel throughout the region. Part of this demand is the result of the flood that took place in May 2015, which damaged multiple roads. 
“There’s a lot of counties we serve, that’s why we run short quite often,” said Meyer. “Normally, we try to get caught up through the winter, but it hasn’t been that way this winter. It’s been walking out the gate as fast as we can produce it; and that’s still due to the flood damage.”

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